Tag Archives: veganism

Is it Possible to be Completely Vegan?

For many, veganism is like one of those religious cults.  Where, as you “progress,” you gain higher and higher levels of clarity, or stature, or sumsuchshit.

Anyway, I have seen this very same attitude apply to vegans.

“I am not totally vegan, I wear Goodwill wool.”

“I am not totally vegan, I just can’t give up cheese.”

“I am 100% vegan.”  

All of these are false.

I am, but.

Veganism today seems like an all or nothing endeavor.  You either are or you are not.  So, under these pretenses, if you are vegan, but still eat cheese/wear wool/drive a Jeep you are not vegan.

For me, veganism is not a black and white proposition.  To me, it is a set of values we can all strive for…yet they are really, honestly, impossible to attain.

156ab53877b7fc96f921d53acfc6505f.jpgIt is NOT a club where everyone compares their virtuousness to one another, and claim to one up each other based, often, on the level of sacrifices one makes.

I read an article on Facebook about how “true” vegans are against the Beyond Burger.  Their argument claims that true vegans should not eat them simply because they “simulate and appear too much like real meat.”  Let that sink in for a minute.  We should be collectively shamed to consume a vegan product on the premise it is too similar to the non-vegan version.  It is purely mad.

True Veganism is Unreachable

I think it is safe to say that veganism is primarily an answer to a pretty cruel and messed up animal rights issue in our society.  Of course there are other reasons, but I will focus on animal rights for now.

It could be said that a “true” vegan (as in a 100% vegan) would cause zero impact to animals.

Right off the bat, that means no transportation other than walking.  Which, as I think about it, probably kills quite a few insects and members of animalia.  Just the other day I heard the accidental, yet unmistakeable crunch of a snail under my shoe.  I felt terrible.

So, as long as you don’t move you are fine.

But what about where you spend your stationary time?  In a home?  Probably not.  That home was put there and replaced natural growth.  Grass, shrubs, trees, and other habitats were destroyed for that home.  Let’s not even talk about clothing and food which relies on a pretty extensive network of ex-habitat and pollution.

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So let’s assume you end up barefoot in the jungle, living off the land.  Well, if you clear any type of space for yourself you are back to impacting animals.  Even if you simply climbed a tree to live, you would be inadvertently killing or at best, displacing bugs and mosses, and animals.

So as long as you moved from the modern world, ended up “au naturale” in a jungle somewhere, not moving, and somehow living in natural underbrush without possibly impacting any other being, then yes, you would be 100% vegan.

And why am I making such an absurd metaphor here?  

Because these are the details that make us all realize that “true” 100% veganism – aka ZERO impact to the animal kingdom – is unattainable.

And, perhaps even more important is this.  Once we know that 100% is unreachable, we realize it is, in fact a gradient.  And, that gradient allows people to determine their own level of veganism.

If you try really hard to be vegan, but on a road trip had to pull off at Burger King for a Morningstar veggie burger (with egg whites), guess what?  You can still be a vegan.

If your own personal goal is to have an minimal an impact to animals and you cannot find a hiking boot that works, and find a leather variant, guess what?  You can still be vegan.

These are true because for me, veganism is not a status symbol.  It is a journey of little decisions that are stitched together to form a lifestyle.  And, sometimes those decisions tip the other way.  And that is OK.

Lynched by the Community?

Nothing really proved my point as much as the lambasting I received in the Portland Vegans Facebook group when I announced my new Vegan Gun Club.  Apparently, according to the rules of veganism established by Lord Vegan, guns and veganism are exclusive.  You cannot be vegan and still own/shoot paper and steel.

Well, my first outing of that very gun club proved otherwise.  We had a massive turnout, good food, and great fellow vegan company.

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Vegan Gun Club.  Photo (c) Zachary P. Hill

And I know my opinions here are not going to be agreed on by all the vegans.  And that is OK too.  They can continue to beat themselves up over fake meats, stockholders of vegan corporations, and wether they can shop at Safeway and eat at Taco Bell.

I have guns to shoot and Jeeps to offroad.

Does this Vegan Support Hunting?

I find that a lot of the issues surrounding animal rights nowadays are pretty polarizing.  On one side, we have organizations like PETA that grab headlines with crazy stunts.  On the other hand, we have people like Ted Nugent screaming about how many animals he mercilessly slayed.

I find that the vegans are preaching to the vegan choir, and the hunting, consumptive users are preaching to Ted Nugent.

And, with that scenario, it is impossible to make any progress.

Johnathan Safran Foer, in his book Eating Animals laid out an extraordinary story about a vegan that helped build a slaughterhouse.  Basically this vegan wanted the ability to help build and design an ethical(ish) slaughterhouse.  This viewpoint is similar to my personal objective on hunting.

1. Global Veganism just ain’t happenin.

Do I wish that tomorrow, the World would be vegan?  Yes. Absolutely. We would very quickly improve a lot of the health issues we all face, as well as make inroads on curing hunger, and potentially reverse climate change, as well as countless other benefits.

But we all know that just about will not happen.  So, once we can accept that, we need to ask ourselves the next question.

If the World isn’t vegan, what is the next best moral position?

 

Continue reading Does this Vegan Support Hunting?

Why am I Vegan? Part 2: The People.

NOTE: This post contains a lot of linked articles and reference materials.  Click on any images to read more of the referenced article.

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Whenever I am in a discussion about veganism with someone, the conversation almost immediately turns to the animals.  And, the inevitable comparison also follows:

“So you think that animals are above people?”

Of course my answer to this question is a resounding no – but not because of some self-implemented superiority complex (ala speciesism) but more because I don’t think there is an “importance pyramid.”  Everyone on this planet should just be treated  with the same respect.

But let’s just take the more popular approach for a second, the approach where humans are in fact superior to everything else.  And, if you agree with this approach, you should be vegan. AND, if you are a rabid immigration reformist you should also be vegan.

Read on.

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Click to read more.

The large meat production corporations (think Tyson, Smithfield Farms, Cargill and National Beef) have always setup facilities in areas of rural economic hardship.  This is because to work in their facilities, you must offer either large sums of money, or in the case of rural America, just a “good paying job.”  So the labor is cheap and plentiful.  And most people in these areas are familiar with agriculture and harvesting of animals. Check and mate.

But even these good paying jobs and corporate benefits are not enough to keep turnover low.  Working in these facilities is a physical and psychological nightmare.  It really does take a desperate (or psychopathic) person to spend a 10 hour shift slicing open the throats of animals and watching them bleed out.

Click to read the article.
Click to read the article.

So, instead of addressing these issues and improving worker conditions, the slaughterhouses are luring illegal immigrants from Central America and using their illegal status as a retention tool.  Want to quit?  They’ll call ICE and have you at the curb waiting for deportation.  And, as in the case of Tyson, they’ll keep a large portion (10-30%) of your pay too.

This article dives deep into only one example of many.

“Those arrested were bused to the National Cattle Congress in Waterloo for hearings in a makeshift courtroom. Most pleaded guilty to identity theft charges, spent five months in prison and were then deported. Many families were split up for years by the deportations.”

Big corporations are bringing illegal immigrants into this country.  And you support them with your dollars.
Big corporations are bringing illegal immigrants into this country. And you support them with your dollars.

PRI has a fantastic article and podcast on this very issue.

There is even a fascinating link between slaughterhouse facilities and violent crime. Psychology Today offers even more insights.

Perhaps you are OK with using illegal immigrants to do the dirty work this country is not willing to do.  But what about mentally challenged Americans?

In Iowa, a slaughterhouse (meat packing facility) that processed turkey just about enslaved a team of 21 mentally challenged men, forcing them to live in squalid “bunkhouse” conditions.  I am not making this stuff up.

Click to read the article.  This bunkhouse housed 21 mentally challenged people.
Click to read the article. This bunkhouse housed 21 mentally challenged people.

The story is rife with horrible working conditions, physical abuse, and mental manipulation.

Even for the legal worker that can withstand the task at hand, slaughterhouses are some of the most dangerous places to work. That same article cites, “According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, meatpacking is the nation’s most dangerous occupation. In 1999, more than one-quarter of America’s nearly 150,000 meatpacking workers suffered a job-related injury or illness. The meatpacking industry not only has the highest injury rate, but also has by far the highest rate of serious injury—more than five times the national average, as measured in lost workdays. “

That is an older statistic, but the technology in these factories has not changed much in the last 15 years.

Additionally, when these workers are unable to maintain their jobs due to these conditions, who pays the bill?  We all do via welfare, worker’s compensation insurance, and other social support systems.   The costs of these corporate failures falls back on the wallets of us all.

Iowa Public Radio has a great series “In the Shadows of the Slaughterhouse.  I highly recommend it.

The bottom line:  When we feel that humans are superior to all other living beings, that same approach trickles down within our own societies.  We can manipulate minority groups and abuse the law, just as we in turn manipulate animals and abuse them to fit our own needs and agenda.

By moving to a more plant-based diet, we not only prevent the needless suffering of literally billions of animals, but also the injury of 140,000+ meat industry workers, reduce illegal immigration, and prevent fellow Americans from working in some pretty horrible conditions.

Why am I Vegan? Part 1: The Animals.

Food is a weird thing.

When you really boil it down (no pun intended), the point of food is to act as nourishment for our bodies.  Somewhere along the line, the importance of food changed into more of a social and even ideological undertaking.  What a luxury.

hunger

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I consider the ability to be vegan a highly privileged option.  A lot of people in this World barely have enough to eat, and yet vegans can determine what they want to eat on an ideological level.  Let me say that again.

We actually have the luxury of turning down certain foods because we don’t agree with how it was raised/what it is/where it comes from/how it is cooked/etc.

So I make this choice with a great deal of appreciation for the circumstances in my life that let me make these decisions. Continue reading Why am I Vegan? Part 1: The Animals.

Can you Be Vegan and Still Keep your Man Card? (Possibly NSFW)

Manly stereotypes have been around as long as the image of a brawny lumberjack graced the wrappings of our favorite paper towels.

We have “Hungry Man” frozen meals, deodorants that promise zombie-slaying odor fighting, and tales of men that eat raw meat they slaughter themselves.  Marketers show us that the only real way to enjoy a sports game is by drinking beer and slapping some juicy steaks on the grill, or downing a platter of buffalo wings.

But where do tofu scrambles and bags of soy curl jerky come into play?  I want to identify some of the fallacies (freudian slip intended) that exist.

Continue reading Can you Be Vegan and Still Keep your Man Card? (Possibly NSFW)